榛勫ぇ浠欏洓鑲栦笁鏈熷繀鍑? Cummins employees in Australia among volunteers fighting wildfires

Volunteer firefighter Scott Marks (left) watches as pine trees burst into flames near a house he was protecting in Balmoral Village, New South Wales, Australia.
Volunteer firefighter Scott Marks (left) watches as pine trees burst into flames near a house he was protecting in Balmoral Village, New South Wales, Australia.

Cummins South Pacific Electrician Scott Marks didn’t have time to think about anything but the safety of his fellow volunteer firefighters when the tall pines about 100 meters from the house they were protecting suddenly burst into flames.

香港六合开彩结果 www.lkiju.com Australia’s wildfires in late December had already taken a heavy toll on Balmoral Village where Marks lives, about 120 kilometers southwest of Sydney in New South Wales, Australia. Now, the flames were quickly moving his way, close enough Marks could hear the fire’s low, angry roar.

“Looking back, I’m not sure what I thought at that moment,” said Marks, adding that by then Balmoral was something like a war zone, with firefighters and residents scrambling throughout the village to protect people and property as red-hot embers fell from above. “In a situation like that you don’t have a lot of time to think. You just act.”

But before the firefighters could find a way to safety, the winds changed yet again, and the fire took off in a new direction. Both the house and the firefighters were safe.

Others were not so lucky. By the time the fire was out, around 18 of Balmoral’s roughly 200 houses had been lost. And two firefighters from a volunteer brigade outside Sydney died a few kilometers away from Balmoral when a tree fell into the path of their convoy, causing their vehicle to roll off the road.?

Marks, a volunteer firefighter for the past eight years, is one of about 30 Cummins employees who took time off to help fight the fires that touched every state in Australia, killing more than 30 people since September, destroying thousands of homes and scorching more than 11 million hectares of land.

While not all came as close to the fires as Marks, they each played an important role in the effort. Volunteer firefighters are the backbone of Australia’s fire service, extending protection to sparsely populated areas where there simply aren’t the resources to pay full-time firefighters.

Australia has a land mass just a little bit smaller than the?United States, with a total population approximately one-tenth its size.

PUT TO THE TEST

The volunteers have been put to the test this summer by the hot, dry conditions, strong winds, and an unusual number of lightning strikes, creating the worst fire season even the most experienced volunteers can remember.

Cummins South Pacific’s Kevin Adams is a Product Support Advisor based in Karratha along the northern coast of Western Australia. He became a volunteer firefighter in 2016 and since then he’s mostly fought grass fires and perhaps the occasional house fire.

But last month he found himself far from home, fighting the biggest wildfires he had ever seen. His brigade of about 20 firefighters was asked to come to a remote area in Western Australia about 900 kilometers east of Perth to help contain a fire.?

Adams had the necessary skills to operate the heavy equipment critical to the effort. The fires were far from any significant supplies of water. Crews instead built fire breaks designed to contain the blaze by robbing it of the fuel needed to spread.

When he first saw the flames they were up against, which closed the major east-west highway Australia, he knew the stakes were high.

Ride? along (above) with Cummins South Pacific's Kevin Adams as he sees the wildfires he's fighting in Western Australia.

The flames sometimes extended a story or more into the air, consuming grass, bushes, trees and anything else in the fire’s way. Thick black smoke darkened the otherwise blue skies above.

Some people had been stuck in roadhouses along the highway for several days because of the fire and a few communities were cut off from essential services. The closure of the highway impacted the economy, too. Businesses, including Cummins, couldn’t send and receive goods from other states.

Perhaps his most memorable moment, beyond the sheer size of the fire, was when Adams was part of a caravan of about 200 vehicles evacuating nearly 400 people from a community cut off by the blaze.

“To see their faces and how happy they were, that was very rewarding,” Adams said.

MANAGING THE FIGHT

Volunteers have not only been on or near the front lines in Australia, they’ve also been managing a lot of the logistics behind the effort.

Ashley Waugh is a Mine Site Representative at Cummins based in Dubbo, a city in east-central New South Wales. He’s also Captain of a local brigade of 50 firefighters and he helps manage eight helicopters and nine fixed-wing fire bombers for the state fire agency’s aircraft office.

“In addition to my work with the brigade, my job is to help ensure a smooth air operation that has the right equipment in the right place at the right time,” Waugh said.?

Although he’s not a pilot, he developed a strong interest in the role air support plays in firefighting and eventually took a more formal position helping to manage helicopters and aircraft.

Watch one of the fire bombers (above) managed by Ashley Waugh deliver fire retardant to protect trees from approaching wildfires in Australia.

His job this fire season has meant knowing where there might be supplies of water available for the large buckets that helicopters can carry. The dry weather?significantly reduced water levels in many reservoirs.

Waugh also had to ensure there was a helicopter available to protect the Wollemi Pines, a small gathering of trees in the Blue Mountains of Wollemi National Park, about 120 kilometers northwest of Sydney. The so-called “dinosaur trees” are a national treasure dating back more than 200 million years.

“This has been the worst season I can remember,” Waugh said. “The number of lightning strikes has been very bad, unlike anything I’ve seen before.”

LOOKING AHEAD

Waugh and the other Cummins volunteer firefighters hope they’ve seen the worst of the fire season. Heavy rains blanketed much of Australia recently, significantly reducing the fire threat.

Should dangerous conditions return,?however, you can expect the volunteers will be ready to spring into action again.
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blair claflin director of sustainability communications

Blair Claflin

Blair Claflin is the Director of Sustainability Communications for Cummins Inc. Blair joined the Company in 2008 as the Diversity Communications Director. Blair comes from a newspaper background. He worked previously for the Indianapolis Star (2002-2008) and for the Des Moines Register (1997-2002) prior to that. [email protected]

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Speaking up, speaking out

Cummins - Mission Vision Values

A message from Tom Linebarger, Cummins Chairman and CEO, to all Cummins employees, customers and members of the communities?in which we operate.?

Tom Linebarger - Cummins Chairman and CEOI write this message today with a very heavy heart. Like many of you, I have been horrified and angered by recent events, including the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis. The anger and frustration spilling into the streets reflect longstanding problems that must be addressed. ?In the US, black people are discriminated against in systemic ways, often marginalized, and have increasing reason to fear for their lives.

It pains me that we have such deep-rooted racial and structural inequality in our country. And it pains me that we have been talking about this for far too long, and yet the intolerance and violence continues. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., a man of peace, noted that a riot "is the language of the unheard."?

No one should feel afraid to go for a neighborhood run or to walk through a park. ?Of course, no place is entirely safe and there are bad actors in every society. ?But we know that it is not the same kind of danger for all of our citizens. We live in one country, yet our experiences are very different based on how we experience law enforcement – as protectors or as threats. For those of us who have the privilege to not worry that our son might be killed today because somebody thinks they just "look guilty,"?it is too easy to stand by and watch, wondering if people are overreacting. ?I keep thinking about how different my world would feel if my children were under threat.?

We each have a role to play in?calling for greater accountability from our government, from law enforcement, our neighbors and ourselves.

As a community, and particularly those of us who have the privilege of not living with the fear and constant threats to our well-being, we need to leverage our influence and power to speak up and speak out. We can no longer be silent or sit on the sidelines. We each have a role to play in calling for greater accountability from our government, from law enforcement, our neighbors and ourselves. We need to raise the bar and hold ourselves to a higher standard. What we have today is simply not good enough. We need to work together to root out hate and replace it with a deep and abiding appreciation for diversity, equality, and inclusion. It starts with us. And we cannot wait.

I know that the COVID-19 pandemic has changed the ways that we connect and express caring for one another. It is not as easy to talk to each other as it used to be. But we can still connect with others, and it has never been more important to do so. ?I am asking you to be proactive and to check in with your colleagues and friends, your team members, and others who you think might be impacted in some way by the current events. Don’t wait for the next scheduled call – do it today. Ask them how they are doing. Be fully present and listen empathetically and engage with genuine care.?

Our leadership team is closely monitoring the situation in Minneapolis and around the country. Site leaders will reach out to employees who work at a facility that is or might be directly affected?to discuss safety and security measures.?

I am grateful to work for a company that cares about our people and that works to include all members of our community in our success. ?

Thank you for all that you do.

Stay safe,

Tom Linebarger
Chairman and CEO
Cummins Inc.?

Tom Linebarger Chairman and CEO

Tom Linebarger

Tom Linebarger became Chairman and CEO of Cummins Inc., the largest independent maker of diesel engines and related products in the world, on January 1, 2012. ?Prior to becoming Chairman and CEO, he served as President and COO from 2008 to 2011, Executive Vice President and President, Power Generation Business from 2003 to 2008, Vice President and Chief Financial Officer from 2000 to 2003, and Vice President, Supply Chain Management from 1998 to 2000.

Cummins employee joins the frontlines of the fight in the U.K. against COVID-19

Cummins employee Stephen Layton checks the medical gases at the Nightingale Hospital at ExCeL London.
Cummins employee Stephen Layton checks the medical gases at the Nightingale Hospital at ExCeL London.

Stephen Layton is a Cummins employee in the U.K. and?a husband and father to?three children. With COVID-19 cases rising, it would have been easy to become insular. But when he thought he could help, Layton?didn’t hesitate. ?

Prior to joining Cummins as a telecommunications manager, Layton?worked in the medical gas testing industry, ensuring that oxygen and other essential gases needed in hospital intensive care units were up to standards.

When the pandemic escalated in the U.K., Layton?was sought after by contacts from his medical gas testing days to help as a volunteer testing the medical gases at some locations including the Nightingale Hospital at ExCeL London.

The Nightingale Hospital at ExCeL London.
The Nightingale hospitals like the one at ExCeL London provided valuable capacity to the British health care system at the peak of the virus outbreak and will remain open in case the virus spikes again.

The exhibition and convention center was initially converted into a 500-bed hospital with ventilators and oxygen to help with the crisis but was later expanded to a 2,000-bed facility.

“I thought about the thousands of people who would need these medical gases to survive and couldn’t say no to playing my part,” said Layton, who has?also volunteered?at the National Exhibition Centre in Birmingham, another convention center converted into a Nightingale Hospital about two hours northwest of London.?

He has completed more than 100 volunteer hours at these hospitals and is scheduled for more. Layton?and the team he’s working with have now tested gases on more than 3,000?bed-stations at different Nightingale hospitals. Each bed has an oxygen supply to deliver directly to patients and another oxygen and medical air supply to run ventilators.

Through it all, for Layton?and the team, safety has been?the number one priority.?

“We adhere to the highest safety and hygiene procedures at all times,” he said. “We drive in separate cars to the hospitals, even though most of us live close to each other and could carpool; we keep our masks on; we wash our hands frequently and we maintain good distance while working.”?

Layton is one of many people around the world putting themselves on the line to help in the response to COVID-19. His volunteer service and dedication embodies the Cummins values of caring and integrity.


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Cummins Office Building

Cummins Inc.

Cummins is a global power leader that designs, manufactures, sells and services diesel and alternative fuel engines from 2.8 to 95 liters, diesel and alternative-fueled electrical generator sets from 2.5 to 3,500 kW, as well as related components and technology. Cummins serves its customers through its network of 600 company-owned and independent distributor facilities and more than 7,200 dealer locations in over 190 countries and territories.

Doing our part: Increasing digital inclusion through technology

Global Accessibility Awareness Day 2020
GAAD is an annual observance dedicated to encouraging the world to talk, think and learn about digital access, inclusion and people with different disabilities.?

This year marks the ninth Global Accessibility Awareness Day (GAAD), an annual observance dedicated to encouraging the world to talk, think and learn about digital access, inclusion and people with different disabilities.?

At Cummins, we have a deep-rooted commitment to empowering our employees to reach their full potential by working to ensure a truly diverse, accessible, equitable and inclusive environment. For Dennis Heathfield, Executive Director of Inclusion – People with Disabilities and Veterans at Cummins, the opportunity to join GAAD and help the organization amplify its mission is a no brainer.

“Our goal is to reduce barriers to employment for people with disabilities and having accessible technology is a first step in that,” Heathfield said. “We are proud to recognize Global Accessibility Awareness Day and partner with our employees to ensure they have technology to meet their needs.”?

Making technology accessible

As a company with more than 60,000 employees around the world, efforts to create an inclusive work environment extend to the technology Cummins employees use to perform their jobs, including websites, software, computers and mobile devices.?

The company’s aim is to enable employees to fully and independently understand, navigate and interact with technology functions and features easily and effectively.?

“We believe that technology is for everyone,” Heathfield added. “As a company with a rich history of diverse and inclusive policies, we continuously look for ways to make the tools our employees use every day more accessible for users of all abilities.”?

From speech recognition software to captioned telephones (CapTel), the following portfolio of solutions – available to Cummins employees around the world – highlights the company’s continuous efforts to ensure that employees get the most from their technology.?

  1. Speech Recognition Software - The enterprise-ready speech recognition solution converts speech to text empowering employees to create high-quality documentation faster and more efficiently.
  2. Text Prediction Software – AI-powered text predictions help employees avoid typing the same text over and over again in applications they use every day.
  3. Magnifier/Reader Software – A magnifier/reader is a fully integrated magnification and reading program tailored for low-vision users. Magnifiers/readers enlarge and enhance everything on an employee’s computer screen, echoing their typing and essential program activity, and automatically reading documents, web pages and email.
  4. Captioned Telephones - Designed exclusively for individuals with hearing loss, captioned phones (CapTel) work just like any other phone, but users can listen and read word-for-word captions of everything said over the phone.

Ways you can help

Ready to take action? Learn more about GAAD and obtain guidance on how to improve digital accessibility in your workplace by visiting Global Accessibility Awareness Day online, and read about Cummins’ long history of diversity and inclusion.?

You can also help spread the word about GAAD on social media by joining the conversation and tagging your posts with #GAAD and #InclusionAtCummins.?

Lauren O'Dell Sidler - Cummins Inc.

Lauren O'Dell Sidler

As a senior communications specialist with Cummins Inc., Lauren O’Dell Sidler works with Cummins leaders to develop and implement communications strategies that reach Cummins’ global audience.?

Employee uses analytical skills to help hospital plan for COVID-19

Cummins employee Stephen Aryee's model will help health care officials in his community.
Cummins employee Stephen Aryee's model will help health care officials in his community.

Having grown up in western Africa, Stephen Aryee is no stranger to health epidemics and the devastating impact they can have on communities.

When he read a news article in early March about COVID-19 cases in the U.S. where he lives now, Aryee was curious to understand how the virus could impact his local community. He thought he might be able to help others gain insights because of his work at Cummins in strategy and market intelligence.

“I felt a sense of urgency when I saw the data,” said Aryee, a Market Insights Segment Leader in the Strategy group. “I felt compelled to find a way to help.”?

MINING THE DATA

Using data he found on Johns Hopkins University’s website, he began building a model focused on Bartholomew County, Indiana, where he currently lives and works and where Cummins has its headquarters. In under a week, the model was complete, producing four key outputs:

??? ?Actual infections compared to confirmed cases, showing community leaders how the virus may be spreading but hasn’t been captured by confirmed tests. ?
??? ?Potential hospitalizations based on real cases instead of confirmed cases.?
??? ?Time for a surge to reach hospitals, helping health officials with capacity planning, so they have enough resources to respond.?
??? ?Expected peak of infection if social distancing guidelines are implemented.?
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“I knew that if we were behind the curve when the surge hit our community, it would result in a lot of lost lives,” Aryee said. “We’ve got to have a handle on this. I thought if I could make the right models, it would help leaders make informed decisions.”?

PERFECT TIMING

He presented his work to a Cummins business leader, who immediately connected him to Jim Schacht, Executive Director of Community Relations and Corporate Responsibility, and also a member of a Columbus, Indiana, based coronavirus task force. Schacht?quickly shared Aryee’s work with leaders at the city’s hospital, Columbus Regional Health (CRH).?

Aryee’s work couldn’t have come at a better time. The executive team at CRH was already working with an analytics group to apply state-level data but needed help localizing it to the 11-county region the hospital serves. He shared his work with CRH leaders to help with modeling data as they define action plans.

“His current role at Cummins requires using lots of data to create a forecast,” said Jahon Hobbeheydar, Executive Director of Corporate Strategy. “I’m proud of him for applying his unique skills to benefit his community in this critical time of need.”?

Cummins Office Building

Cummins Inc.

Cummins is a global power leader that designs, manufactures, sells and services diesel and alternative fuel engines from 2.8 to 95 liters, diesel and alternative-fueled electrical generator sets from 2.5 to 3,500 kW, as well as related components and technology. Cummins serves its customers through its network of 600 company-owned and independent distributor facilities and more than 7,200 dealer locations in over 190 countries and territories.

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